Posted in self-improvement, spiritual/religious

Promised Land Living

promised land living

One in a Million: Journey to Your Promised Land was one of my Lenten reads. The writing style of the author appealed to me as did the subject matter. Here are some nuggets from Part 1:

  1. Promised land living is living with milk and money. God didn’t promise just a land of milk (substance for living). He also promised honey (abundant living). Milk may be what we need, but honey is what we crave (imagine hot tea without honey). Some of the honey we’re given includes confidence, joy, discernment, anticipation, and power. Promised land living is a life of depth, substance, and faith-fiber, but it is also a life filled with colors, textures, and unexpected opportunities.

Just like elephants at a circus are held in place by 2 simple bolts, so are we from promised land living. One bolt is the curse of sin. The curse of sin was broken at the foot of the cross. So if you’ve resolved your position in Christ (also known as positional sanctification), you only have to concern yourself with the second bolt – lifestyle sanctification.

There is a big difference between being free and living free. Being free is one decision. Living free is a daily decision. It is not enough for us to know that we are free, we must live free. So, what’s holding you back from living free? What are your hindrances? What are your time wasters? What are you distractions?

Let’s be honest. We tend to like and remain fond of some of parts of our enslaved past. We remember the past as being fun, captivating, and enjoyable. We convince ourselves that living free isn’t as good as some of our past addictions. It’s addictive enjoyment. Looking back keeps us from looking forward. That’s where the dilemma lies – letting the satisfaction of physical appetites take priority over what living free has for us.

  1. Under the category of “be careful what you wish for” the author tells the story of going for a run and seeing storm clouds. Having felt separated from fullness of living, the author looked up to the clouds and prayed for a good spiritual rain. Soon a heavy physical rain began to fall causing the author to cut short her run and head for the shelter of her home. In her heart she heard, “This is what people do. They pray for rain and then when it pours, they run back to familiar comforts.”

I like this story because it reminds me of my move. I remember wanting a certain position, AND wanting to live by the ocean. Finally, it became clear to me that I could have one but not the other, so I had to decide which one I really wanted. I could live by the ocean in a lesser professional position or I could have the position I wanted. One day the question came to me, as long as it is water, does it have to be the ocean? My answer was “okay, but the water has to move. There is nothing sadder than stagnant water.”   I was imagining a small moving stream;  yet because I was open, I received Lake Erie and Lake Ontario and boy do they move. As the chapter states – be careful what you ask for.

Cite: Shirer, P. (2010). ONE in a Million: Journey to Your Promised Land. Nashville, TN: B&H Publishing, Inc.

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Author:

Dr. Sheila Embry is a govie, author, pracademician, sister, aunt, cousin, and friend who loves to read, write, think, and laugh. Many of her blog postings are summaries or excerpts of books that she read and wants to share to encourage others. An author with more than 25 years experience within the legislative and executive branches of the U. S. federal government holding 3 accredited degrees: Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership, Master of Arts in Human Resources Development, and Baccalaureate of Business Administration, she believes in continuing learning both on and off the job. She has been recognized with multiple professional and writing awards for her peer-reviewed, publications. Click the bibliography page above for a listing of all the publications.

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