Posted in Blog, Self Improvement, Spiritual/Religious

Development Thoughts

 Journey

From A Walk on the Beach by Joan Anderson – Advice from her mentor, Joan Erickson (She was wise, bohemian by nature, and routinely defied society’s rules. She waved with both arms in a grand gesture.)

Get out of your head and into your body. Become more active than passive, lean on your senses, feel the intensity of the experience, and don’t be “sooo serious.” Vital living is all about action and touch.

Action needs a counterpoint, and destiny always develops in silence.

Learning from life is much more beneficial than learning from a book. If given a choice, stand up and shout. You can’t substitute words for experience. You have to get out and embrace things.

Plan to get away from dependence as soon as possible.

Live up to what you’ve gotten hold of and don’t let it melt.

When you hit bottom, figure out as quickly as possible how to get out of it. Do something, even if it’s just making a pile of pebbles.

Welcome each day like a good meal.

Know your strengths, overdose on senses, remain active and playful. Activities become fertile ground for musing.

Always give a little more energy; the tension should always be there.

Be generative. Share what you know. Pass it on; that is what makes all the difference.

It is important to always look out not back.

We all have original thoughts. It’s just a matter of harnessing them.

There is a plan for everyone if you are open to it. A full life needs to be about self-cultivation.

The magic of life happens in a way that challenges us to change our plans.

I knew what was real and natural for me, what satisfied me. Normal is natural, and natural is wild.

Life is a progression. It’s important to be aware and ready to greet its next passage. It takes time to rinse off the past.

It’s fun to have a purpose; it keeps the adrenaline going.

Theory without action does not lead to strength. Don’t feel passion, be passionate.

Dance when you are broken open, dance when you’ve torn the bandage off, dance when you are in the middle of fighting, and dance to be free. Always remember no matter how hard you dance, not everyone will clap. Always be willing to dance anyway.

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Author:

Dr. Sheila Embry is a govie, author, pracademician, sister, aunt, cousin, and friend who loves to read, write, think, and laugh. Many of her blog postings are summaries or excerpts of books that she read and wants to share to encourage others. An author with more than 25 years experience within the legislative and executive branches of the U. S. federal government holding 3 accredited degrees: Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership, Master of Arts in Human Resources Development, and Baccalaureate of Business Administration, she believes in continuing learning both on and off the job. She has been recognized with multiple professional and writing awards for her peer-reviewed, publications. Click the bibliography page above for a listing of all the publications.

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