Posted in Hawaii, Hawaii & South Pacific

The Death of Captain Cook

DSC04286

 

After using up all the Hawaiian hospitality and supplies, Captain Cook planned to return to Britain. Shortly after leaving the Big Island, the ship broke a mast, making it necessary to return to Kealakekua Bay for repairs. As they sailed back in the bay, the Hawaiians were nowhere to be seen. A chief had declared the area kapu (forbidden) to help replenish it. When Cook finally found the Hawaiians, they were polite but wary. “Why are you back? “ “Didn’t we please you enough already?” “What do you want now?”

As repair of the mast continued, things got tense. Eventually some Hawaiians stole one of Cook’s rowboats (for the nails), and the normally calm Cook blew his cork. On February 14, 1779, Cook went ashore to trick the chief to come aboard his ship, where he planned to detain the chief until the rowboat was detained. As they were headed to the ship, the chief’s wife begged him not to go.

Thousands of Hawaiians were now crowded around Cook. He ordered a retreat. Suddenly, a shot was heard from across the bay. Someone shouted that the Englishman had killed an important chief. A shielded warrior with a dagger came at Cook. Cook shot at the warrior. The Hawaiians became emboldened. More shots were fired.

Standing knee high in water, Cook turned to give the order to cease fire when he was struck from behind with a club. He was then stabbed…dozens of times. At the age of 50, Cook, the world’s great explorer, was dead because of a stolen rowboat.

 

Cite: O’ahu Revealed by Andrew Doughty

 

Advertisements

Author:

Dr. Sheila Embry is a govie, author, pracademician, sister, aunt, cousin, and friend who loves to read, write, think, and laugh. Many of her blog postings are summaries or excerpts of books that she read and wants to share to encourage others. An author with more than 25 years experience within the legislative and executive branches of the U. S. federal government holding 3 accredited degrees: Doctor of Management in Organizational Leadership, Master of Arts in Human Resources Development, and Baccalaureate of Business Administration, she believes in continuing learning both on and off the job. She has been recognized with multiple professional and writing awards for her peer-reviewed, publications. Click the bibliography page above for a listing of all the publications.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s